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"15? WILLIAM STANLEY HASELTINE was born in 
If^f'^hiladelphia 11th June 1835 and died in Rome 3rd 
^February 1900. 

, His work, marked by three definite phases, might 
Bl be described as belonging to the three rivers which 
PPhe loved above all others: the Delaware, the Rhine 
and the Tiber. In his earliest youth he learned to 
draw and paint by the banks of the Delaware; and 
his work of that time gives evidence of his excep- 
tional aptitude for drawing. The second phase started 
when he went to Diisseldorf on the Rhine, and when 
Andreas Achenbach widened his horizon and opened 
his eyes to the greater beauty and emotion under- 
lying the production of works of art. The third and 
last phase, in which he has been called a "pre-impres- 
sionist," developed in Rome by the Tiber; of the 
hourly color changes here he used to say, "There is 
no light like that in the Campagna Romana." 

He began painting under Paul Weber in Phila- 
delphia at the age of fifteen, and studied with him 
in his spare time while a freshman and sophomore 
^kat the University of Pennsylvania. He transferred to 
ZL Harvard, where he was graduated in 1854 at the age 
of nineteen; returning to Philadelphia, he continued 
working with Weber. The old man, however, had 
decided to return to his native Germany, and easily 
persuaded young Haseltine to go with him. 

In Diisseldorf Haseltine studied under Andreas 
Achenbach, Weber's old mentor, and continued de- 
veloping his draughtsmanship in emulation of the 
German mastery of drawing. Here, too, he became 
closely linked with three American artists, all older 
than himself — Emanuel Leutze, Worthington Whit- 
tredge and Albert Bierstadt — who remained lifelong 
friends. With them he made the journey of the Rhine 
to its source in Switzerland; and in 1856 they all went 
to Rome together. During this period, when German 
scenery gave way to the more virile landscape of the 
Alps, there began a long crescendo of activity for 
him; but this productivity was only a preliminary to 
the hundreds of sketches which Italy inspired him to 
^^ make with all the joy of youth. Already he showed 
^W his first leaning toward impressionism, which later 
developed in France. 



He returned to New York in 1858 and took up 
his quarters in the Studio Building at 51 West Tenth 
Street, where his friends Leutze, Whittredge and^^ 
Bierstadt had already established themselves. His^_^ 
work was well received in the United States; he held 
exhibitions in Philadelphia, and in New York at the 
Century and Salamagundi clubs, and sold a number 
of important paintings. In 1861 he was elected a 
member of the National Academy of Design. 

He married Helen Marshall, daughter of Captain 
Charles Henry Marshall, owner of the Black Ball 
Line, in 1866; and for a few years they hved in Paris. 
At this time he attached himself to the Barbizon 
school, then waging war with the Academicians; and 
he exhibited in the Salon every year. Contemporane- 
ous critics sometimes found his work in color and 
line unfinished and too vigorous. It is certain that he 
admired Monet's paintings; one of his own works, 
some years later, was mistaken for a Monet. 

No matter where he happened to be living in 
Europe, he made annual visits to the United States, 
where his paintings of the New England coast con-^[^ 
tinued to be appreciated and found a ready sale. His - 
large painting of the ruins of the Greek theatre in 
Taormina, Sicily, was exhibited at the Centennial Ex- 
hibition in Philadelphia in 1876; soon afterward, his 
name appeared as one of the founders of the Ameri- 
can Academy in Rome, and he was also instrumental 
in helping to complete the building of the American 
Episcopal Church in Rome. As in every city where 
he might make his home, his studio in Rome was the 
meeting-place for people of varied pursuits in life: 
artists, writers, diplomats, American visitors to Rome. 

In 1893, Haseltine served on the Art Committee 
for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. 
Between 1890 and 1899 he lived, with his family, 
in the United States for the greater part of the time. 
Toward the end of this decade he and his son, 
Herbert, well known today as a sculptor of animals, 
toured through the American West, going northward 
along the Pacific Coast to Alaska. Ha made many 
watercolors of Monterey and of the country along ^m 
the Columbia River; and filled his sketch-books with "^ 
exquisite watercolors done from the boat going to 



Alaska. "I cannot describe to you," he wrote to his 
wife, "the wonder of our journey; of the six immense 
glaciers coming into view at the same time, one, of 
the most exquisite sapphire blue — wonderful against 
the snow mountains and scores of waterfalls lit up 
by the evening sun." 

Who knows what new works might have resulted 
from the impressions of this journey upon a vigorous 
man who was ever fascinated by the variety of the 
earth's surface? In the autumn of 1899 the Haseltine 
family returned to their apartment in the Palazzo 
Altieri; but heart trouble had set in and the artist 
died peacefully in February 1900, a few minutes after 
telling his doctor: "I have only just begun to learn 
to paint." 



1. Tivoli, 1858 * 

2. Cannes, 1875 ** 

3. Rock study, Mt. Desert, 1859 * 

4. San Pietro, Porto Venere, Spezia * * 

5. San Pietro, Gulf of Spezia * 

6. Fortress in Switzerland * * 

7. Spezia * 

8. Near the Rhine, Germany, 1855 * 

9. Capri, 1858 * 

10. Dutch boats, A * 

11. Boats on Riviera or Italian lake ** 

12. Dutch boats, B * 

13. Capri, 1858 * 

14. Murano, Venice ** 

15. Boats on the Adriatic ** 

16. Venice ** 

17. Landscape *** 

18. Sette Sale, Rome ** 

19. Tivoli, 1858 ** 

20. Cloud study, A * 

21. Bruges * 

22. Cloud study, B * 

23. Rapallo, 1881 ** 

24. Greek theater, Taormina ** 

25. Alhambra, 1888 ** 



26. Traunstein, Bavaria ** 

27. Albano, 1882 ** 

28. Mt. Tacoma, 1899 ** J^ 

29. New England coast, 1864 * ^^ 

30. New England coast, 1864 * 

31. New England coast, 1864 * 

32. Mt. Desert, 1859 * 

33. Boats, Venice ** 

34. Fishing boats, Venice** 

35. Laguna, Venice *** 

36. Grand Canal, Venice*** 

37. Blankenberg ** 

38. Tree study ** 

39. Capri, 1858 ** 

40. Seal Harbor, Mt. Desert ** 

41. Crag, Mt. Desert * «y 

42. Natural arch, Capri * 

43. Wetterhorn, Switzerland * 

44. Capri, 1858 * 

45. Rocks, Maine * 

46. Sette Sale, Villa Brancaccio, Rome ** ^ 

47. Campagna Romana, 1881 ** -m 

48. On the slopes of the Hudson * '^ 

49. Peyncat, near Belvidere, Delaware * ^^ 

50. Campagna Romana, 1858 * v_ 

51. Belvidere, Delaware* 

52. College Hill, Poughkeepsie * 

53. Mill dam in Traunstein, Bavaria ** "■-- 

54. Vahrn woods, Tyrol ** jja 

55. Torrent in wood, Vahrn, Tyrol ** " 

56. Seelisberg, Lake Lucerne, 1857 * 

57. Vahrn, Tyrol ** 



Drawings ♦ 
Water colors ** 
Oils*** 



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